Canning Altitude Adjustments

Barometric pressure is reduced at high altitudes, affecting the temperature at which water boils. This means water bath (boiling water) and pressure (steam pressure) canning methods must be adjusted to ensure safe food processing. When using the water bath (boiling water) method, additional processing time is required. With the pressure (steam pressure) method, additional pounds pressure is required. The Altitude Chart give the requirements for both methods at various altitudes.


Water Bath (Boiling Water) Method Chart

The processing times given for high acid foods are based on canning at or below 1,000 feet above sea level using the water bath (boiling water) method. When processing at altitudes higher than 1,000 feet above sea level, adjust the processing time according to this chart.

Water Bath (Boiling Water) Canner Altitude Adjustment

Altitude in Feet

Increase Processing Time

1,001 to 3,000

5 minutes

3,001 to 6,000

10 minutes

6,001 to 8,000

15 minutes

8,001 to 10,000

20 minutes



Pressure (Steam Pressure) Method Chart

The pressure (steam pressure) method is used for low acid foods. The pounds pressure given for low acid foods in recipes are based on setting a weighted gauge canner and processing at or below 1,000 feet above sea level. When using a dial gauge canner or processing at altitudes higher than 1,000 feet above sea level, adjust pounds pressure according to this chart.

Pressure (Steam Pressure) Canner Altitude Adjustment

Altitude in Feet

Weighted Gauge

Dial Gauge

0 to 1,000

10

11

1,001 to 2,000

15

11

2,001 to 4,000

15

12

4,001 to 6,000

15

13

6,001 to 8,000

15

14

8,001 to 10,000

15

15

General cooking and baking times and temperatures in recipes are based on altitudes at or below 1,000 feet above sea level. Follow standard cooking and baking guidelines for your elevation.

If you do not know the altitude for your location, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service. Alternative sources of information are your local Soil Conservation Service and your Public Library Service.

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